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Performance Results You Can See

August 22, 2018
This agronomic image shows Agronomist Brett Craigmyle points to untreated corn (L) and corn with an R1 application of Trivapro fungicide (R), highlighting the greener and healthier leaves in the Trivapro-treated plot going into grain fill.

August 10, 2018, Columbia, MO: Agronomist Brett Craigmyle points to untreated corn (L) and corn with an R1 application of Trivapro fungicide (R), highlighting the greener and healthier leaves in the Trivapro-treated plot going into grain fill.

Drive by any Midwestern corn field this time of year, and you’ll notice a sea of once green leaves slowly turning brown – some naturally as corn plants reach the end of their lifecycle and others from disease. Damaged and dying leaves minimize corn’s ability to photosynthesize daylight and turn it into grain.

Visitors to a recent Grow MoreTM Experience event at our Columbia, MO, site were shown similar plots of corn, and some plots were noticeably greener and healthier than others going into grain fill. The only difference between the plots was a timed fungicide application. Of the 3 corn plots, one was untreated, one had a V5 application of Trivapro® fungicide and the third plot had a R1 Trivapro application.

Here’s what we saw:

Untreated plot: showed heavy evidence of gray leaf spot (GLS) and Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) and was noticeably browner than both plots treated with Trivapro fungicide.

NCLB on untreated corn leaves.

NCLB on an untreated corn leaf.

GLS on untreated corn leaves.

GLS on an untreated corn leaf.

V5 Trivapro application plot: showed some signs of disease (GLS, NCLB), but the spread was halted after the fungicide application and did not extend above the ear leaf.

A corn leaf from above the ear leaf (L) shows no significant signs of disease while a leaf from below the ear leaf (R) shows some disease pressure – indicating that the V5 application of Trivapro halted the spread of disease up the plant.

A corn leaf from above the ear leaf (L) shows no significant signs of disease while a leaf from below the ear leaf (R) shows some disease pressure – indicating that the V5 application of Trivapro halted the spread of disease up the plant.

R1 Trivapro application plot: showed slight signs of disease in the lower canopy that had started to form prior to the fungicide application. Disease spread ceased after the application and up to the ear leaf and beyond was virtually disease free, meaning GLS and NCLB would not decrease yield going into grain fill.

Greener, healthier plants heading into harvest maximize yield potential, producing noticeable results on the yield monitor and bankable results at the grain elevator. Similar fungicide trials at our Columbia, MO, site in 2017 showed the yield difference a properly timed fungicide application can make.

Corn treated with Trivapro at R1 shows a significant yield advantage.

2017, Columbia, MO: Corn treated with Trivapro at R1 shows a significant yield advantage.

If you experienced heavy corn disease pressure this season, are looking for higher yields or desire healthier plants with sturdier stalks at harvest, consider making a planned fungicide application in 2019.

We recommend Trivapro, the only fungicide on the market that can be applied at R1 and last until harvest. Applying Trivapro at VT/R1 timing will provide the hardest-working and longest-lasting control of rust, GLS and NCLB. In addition, its plant-health benefits will help maximize grain fill and protect stalk integrity for improved harvest efficiency and reduced volunteer corn the following year.

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All photos are either the property of Syngenta or are used with permission.

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