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Sudden Death Syndrome Could Strike Early-Planted Soybeans

An agronomic image showing the effects of sudden death syndrome on soybean plants.

Soybeans infected with SDS

Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is one of the most destructive soybean diseases, affecting the majority of soybean-growing areas. SDS is often found in fields also infested with soybean cyst nematode (SCN), because SCN feeding causes root damage and creates gateways for this pathogen to infect the plant.

SDS is caused by the soil-dwelling fungus Fusarium virguliforme and flourishes in cool, moist conditions, putting early-planted soybeans at risk. Although early-planted soybean fields typically produce higher yields, the University of Nebraska advises growers to avoid early planting in fields with a history of severe SDS. Another way to reduce the chances of SDS infection is to avoid planting soybeans back to back, says the University of Missouri.

Since there are no in-season treatment options for SCN or SDS, Syngenta encourages growers to take the necessary steps to control both of these pests during planting.

Syngenta recommends growers plant NK® Soybean varieties with resistance to both SCN and SDS. This preventive strategy will provide soybeans with a foundation of protection from these pests.

For an added level of season-long protection against SCN, growers can apply Clariva® Complete Beans seed treatment, a combination of separately registered products. Adding Mertect® 340-F fungicide to this application will help further protect seeds from SDS during the early stages of development.

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